Penis? In MY Lolita?

I admire boys in lolita. Actually, I admire any boy who is not afraid to put on feminine markers, whether it’s a skirt or a bit of eyeliner. But lolita, in particular, takes feminization to a whole new level. There is so much girlishness in lolita that even I sometimes feel like I’m dressing in drag.

As we all know, lolita has a long history of gender-mixing. How many Gothic and Lolita Bible ads have you admired for years, only to discover later that the lolitas you’re admiring–all of the lolitas you’re admiring–were male all along? This is one fashion in which one should never take gender for granted.

There are many possible reasons for why this may be. The ties to Visual Kei are an obvious one, of course. Mana notwithstanding, there are a variety of male artists who prefer the lolita look, such as Aya, Kaya, and others. But beyond the big artists, lolita’s ultra-feminine style exemplifies girlishness in a way that most mainstream fashion does not. For a boy who wants to play at being a girl, there is no better fashion style. If you’re going to be a girl, you may as well go all the way.

Mana

I find that lolita fashion, in many ways, caters to those who wish to soften their masculine features. Just look at how Mana layers his socks and tights to obscure his knees. The way that he uses gloves and long sleeves to hide his arms and hands. The way that his throat is always covered, and how his platform shoes give the rest of his body the illusion of being smaller. The giant bell shape of the skirt perfectly creates the hourglass silhouette that his body does not naturally take, while the lack of shaped bust on his dresses makes his lack of breasts less noticeable. Regardless of the body you started out with, lolita is designed to give you a super-feminine appearance when it is done well.

It is of no surprise that there are some naysayers against our lolita brothers. Of course, there are naysayers against everybody that is perceived as different or a minority in lolita, as would be expected in any fashion subculture, and such people are best ignored. Although one of these people once asked, why is it that whenever a boy shows up in lolita, girls practically trip over themselves trying to be nice to him?

I can’t speak for other girls. I know that many people love the idea of a girl who is a boy who is a girl. But for me, it comes down to the same reason why I prefer to be nice to someone who is just starting out, or someone who is a little overweight. Because they are probably going to have a very hard time of it when they walk out their front door into the real world. Because they are braver than I am. Because they could very well be threatened, hurt, beaten, and humiliated for doing what they are doing. Because maybe, nobody else will tell them that they look beautiful. I believe that every lolita, girl or boy, deserves to feel a little bit beautiful.

There is one nagging blight on my love for the brolita. One thing that tarnishes them in my mind. And that is the brolita who takes a superior attitude. I see it everywhere: in a predominantly female group, one token male walks in and feels the need to act as though his opinions, his experiences, his observations, are better than everyone else’s. Maybe he feels threatened. Maybe he doesn’t know how to communicate in such a situation. But whatever the reason, nothing will kill my sympathy for a boy in lolita faster than self-righteousness.

If you are a boy in lolita, or a boy who wants to be a lolita, or even a boy who just admires lolita, be humble. I know it’s hard, when you’re used to being the one in charge. I know it’s not easy to be the odd one out. But know that lolitas respond infinitely better to somebody who is a little bit humble, who is open to advice, who says “please” and “thank you.” You’ll find that many of your sisters will, quite literally, trip over themselves to help you. If you are a girl in lolita, be nice to your brothers. Know that it took some true bravery to like what you like, and to wear what you wear.

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9 Comments »

  1. too true about brave boys in lolita. also your post came up in my blog’s sidebar as Penis? In MY Lolita? and I completely went WUT. O_O

    • Mary Magdalia said

      LOL Sorry about that! I hope it didn’t ruin the mood of your blog in any way! I could change it, if you’d prefer.

  2. Aimee said

    “I believe that every lolita, girl or boy, deserves to feel a little bit beautiful.”

    Here. here.

    • priss said

      I’m a boy in lolita, and i am 44 years old, married 22 years, and have teen children.

      Thank you ever so much for your thoughts here.

      priss

      • Mary Magdalia said

        Good for you, Priss. I hope you keep right on enjoying lolita.

  3. dollpart said

    According to Xelyna who’s just returned from a 4 year stint in Japan, in places like Baby / AP stores they no longer let men try on the dresses.

    Apparently, bored business men would pop down to the stores, try on the dresses for shits and giggles and irritate the clientele. No doubt that’s annoying but me wonders how this affects the minority of Japanese brolitas out there. Only Meta, Moitie and the more Aristocrat style brands have men’s size Lolita and non-women’s wear Men’s wear.

    “brolita who takes a superior attitude.”

    Ah, you can take the boy out the Patriarchy but can you take the Patriarchy out the boy?

    • Mary Magdalia said

      Oh wow, that’s interesting. I really can’t imagine Random Businessman #237 popping into AP to try on a frilly dress, but it must have happened frequently for them to put a ban on them! I can see how that would seriously bother the employees and patrons. I do feel bad for the Japanese brolitas, because I’m pretty sure there is a decent-sized group of them. AatP still has men’s wear, but I guess it’s more androgynous aristocrat than lolita.

      Ah, you can take the boy out the Patriarchy but can you take the Patriarchy out the boy?

      I suppose that is the million dollar question, isn’t it?

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